James Kincaid

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Contact Information

Adjunct Professor

kincaid@dornsife.usc.edu

617 S

James Kincaid is an Adjunct Professor in Pitt’s English Department.  He is also Professor Emeritus of English and Aerol Arnold Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Southern California.  He received his PhD from Case Western Reserve University.

Kincaid’s scholarship includes earlier studies of Victorian literature and culture and literary theory and more recent scholarship in cultural studies, especially studies of the history and current cultural practices of eroticizing children and instituting elaborate scapegoating rituals to disguise what we are doing.  He has taught courses in criminality/lunacy/perversion, in age studies, in censorship, and in other areas of literary, political, and cultural studies.  

Research and Publications

Kincaid’s publications include Dickens and the Rhetoric of Laughter (1972), Tennyson’s Major Poems (1975), Novels of Anthony Trollope (1977), Annoying the Victorians (1994; reissued 2013), Child-Loving: The Erotic Child and Victorian Culture (1992), Erotic Innocence: The Culture of Child Molesting (1998), and A History of the African-American People (Proposed) by Strom Thurmond, co-authored with Percival Everett. He has also written four novels, including Lost (2012).

Kincaid has been a Guggenheim Fellow, won teaching awards, and run two prestigious seminars for the National Endowment for the Humanities.  He has published in many major scholarly journals and popular periodicals and newspapers, including Critical Inquiry, PMLA, Nineteenth-Century Literature, JEGP, ADE Bulletin, Yale Review, New York Times Book Review, and the New Yorker.  He has also served on the editorial boards of PMLA, Victorian Poetry, Nineteenth Century Studies, Dickens Studies Annual, Nineteenth-Century Literature, and the Journal of Narrative and Life History.  He has been a consultant to the Guggenheim foundation and received USC’s Raubenheimer Outstanding Senior Faculty Award for Teaching and Scholarship (2000).

Courses

Junior seminar:  Making Monsters:  Criminals, Lunatics, and Perverts

Dramatic Imagination